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Research has shown there are benefits that may come from stretching the feet, which may affect the general overall health of the body. When proper foot stretches are performed, the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in the feet may become more flexible, which may enable daily activities to become easier to accomplish. The uncomfortable foot condition known as Athlete’s foot may be prevented as a result of stretching the toes, which may promote healthy spacing. Additionally, balance may be improved when the toes have a full range of motion, and specific foot conditions may be prevented from developing. It may benefit the feet to wear shoes that have adequate room for the toes to move about, in addition to learning how to perform simple toe stretches. It you would like additional information about the benefits of stretching the feet and toes, please consult with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Randy Garr from Utah. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Provo and Spanish Fork, UT. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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The medical condition that is referred to as athlete’s foot will typically affect many different types of people regardless if they are athletes. The tinea fungus is responsible for this uncomfortable ailment and will survive in moist and warm areas. It is known to be extremely contagious, and it often lives in public pools, showers, and surrounding areas. The noticeable symptoms may include cracked and peeling skin between the toes, dry or raw skin on your feet, or an itchy sensation that may affect the entire foot. There may be pre-existing medical conditions that may include diabetes or a weakened immune system, which can contribute to the onset of athlete’s foot. If you feel you may have developed this ailment, it is suggested to seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can perform a proper diagnosis and correct treatment.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Randy Garr from Utah. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms:

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Provo and Spanish Fork, UT. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 12 November 2018 00:00

How Exercise May Improve Circulation

A medical condition that is known as peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common circulatory concern. Noticeable symptoms of this ailment may include feeling a tingling sensation in your feet, numbness, or coldness in the lower extremities. Some patients experience uncomfortable heaviness in their feet in addition to possible cramping in the legs. These sensations are typically a result of diminished blood flow the body needs, which may cause difficulty in maintaining a daily exercise routine. Research has shown despite the pain that mild exercise may cause, it may be necessary to perform simple movements that may aid in adequate blood flow throughout the body. There are specific activities that can be performed frequently that may increase circulation in the body. These may include walking slowly and consistently in addition to swimming for extended periods of time. If you are experiencing cramping in your feet, it’s advised to speak with a podiatrist to learn about additional ways to improve circulation.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Randy Garr of Utah. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness  or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD, and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Provo and Spanish Fork, UT. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Monday, 05 November 2018 00:00

Pregnancy and Oedema

One of the most common ailments pregnant women notice is the onset of swelling in their feet and ankles. This condition is referred to as oedema, and research has shown that it generally affects between fifty to eighty percent of healthy pregnant women. This may typically be a result of the excess pressure the growing fetus exerts on the blood vessels surrounding the pelvis. The circulation process may become slower because of the additional fluid that is retained, and the feet and ankles may be affected by this. Many women have found effective ways to maintain comfort during their pregnancies, including elevating their feet as often possible, avoiding standing for extended periods of time, and performing gentle exercises on a regular basis. Some women have found that wearing compression stockings may aid in reducing a portion of the swelling. If you would like additional information about how pregnancy can affect your feet, it’s suggested to speak with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Dr. Randy Garr from Utah. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What foot problems can arise during pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy, but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How can I keep my feet healthy during pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Provo and Spanish Fork, UT. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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